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Blue abstract  arts
Who lives here: Bec Andersen, textile and community artist
Location: Tamborine Mountain, Queensland state, Australia
What is made here: Hand-tufted area rugs of a hundred per cent normally dyed made of wool
Bec Andersen, formerly from Brisbane, Quotes, moved to Tamborine Mountain from Vancouver, where the girl had lived with the girl Canadian husband, Thor. “I was very pregnant at the time with our daughter Eve-Ruby, who is about to turn thirteen, ”

Andersen says.
The rustic aesthetic of the cottage studio was major things that drew Andersen to the property, and it’s one of the most charming aspects of the space. Wide and welcoming wooden steps lead upward to three sets of barn doors, which

stretch out across the front terrace and provide the studio a farmhouse appeal.

 

 

When asked what she loves most about her studio, Andersen is quick to credit the lovely energy of house. “It is also near to home with everything within it that I need to produce my work, ” she says.

On entering the studio, the most notable feature is the huge vertical framework that Andersen uses to create her pieces. The afternoon light from the west filters softly through the mesh screen, creating a warm and friendly ambience

throughout the area.
The particular studio is full of Andersen’s large collection of natural dyes, wool and books, every corner brimming with color and inspiration. “I keep my space neat and am don’t hold on to things if they happen to be not beautiful and useful, ” she

says.
seat.
by Tamara Armstrong
Tamara Armstrong
When she’s not sitting in the wishing seat, Andersen can often be found at the dining desk, picked up at a garage sale in Brisbane 13 years ago. It offers a workspace as well as a great spot to gather with like-minded creatives.

Andersen regularly gives her passion for making with a series of community workshops and social events. “This is how I host my Happy Hookers team, ” she says. “We drink tea and make things once per month. ”

The particular artist recently led a series of workshops to produce a colorful community installation showcasing rag-rug and paper bead curtains. It was unveiled in the Center in local Beaudesert as part of the cultural events program for the

commemoration of 100 years of Aussie war stories.


Who lives here: Bec Andersen, textile and community artist
Location: Tamborine Mountain, Queensland state, Australia
What is made here: Hand-tufted area rugs of a hundred per cent normally dyed made of wool
Bec Andersen, formerly from Brisbane, Quotes, moved to Tamborine Mountain from Vancouver, where the girl had lived with the girl Canadian husband, Thor. “I was very pregnant at the time with our daughter Eve-Ruby, who is about to turn thirteen, ”

Andersen says.
The rustic aesthetic of the cottage studio was major things that drew Andersen to the property, and it’s one of the most charming aspects of the space. Wide and welcoming wooden steps lead upward to three sets of barn doors, which

stretch out across the front terrace and provide the studio a farmhouse appeal.

When asked what she loves most about her studio, Andersen is quick to credit the lovely energy of house. “It is also near to home with everything within it that I need to produce my work, ” she says.

On entering the studio, the most notable feature is the huge vertical framework that Andersen uses to create her pieces. The afternoon light from the west filters softly through the mesh screen, creating a warm and friendly ambience

throughout the area.
The particular studio is full of Andersen’s large collection of natural dyes, wool and books, every corner brimming with color and inspiration. “I keep my space neat and am don’t hold on to things if they happen to be not beautiful and useful, ” she

says.
seat.
by Tamara Armstrong
Tamara Armstrong
When she’s not sitting in the wishing seat, Andersen can often be found at the dining desk, picked up at a garage sale in Brisbane 13 years ago. It offers a Blue abstract  arts as well as a great spot to gather with like-minded creatives.

Andersen regularly gives her passion for making with a series of community workshops and social events. “This is how I host my Happy Hookers team, ” she says. “We drink tea and make things once per month. ”

The particular artist recently led a series of workshops to produce a colorful community installation showcasing rag-rug and paper bead curtains. It was unveiled in the Center in local Beaudesert as part of the cultural events program for the

commemoration of 100 years of Aussie war stories.